Data management plan

A data management plan (DMP) is a digital document in which you describe what data you will collect during your research project, how you are going to store and manage the data during the project, and what will happen to the data after the project is finished.

Why?

A data management plan makes research data management concrete and practicable: what are you going to do and how?

It saves you time, work and money: by thinking out the management of research data at an early stage, you reduce the chances of having to face nasty surprises later in your research.

A growing number of universities, research institutes and funders make a (succinct) DMP mandatory. 

What?

In a data management plan you provide answers to such questions as:

  • What data are you going to collect? What type of data or what file formats? How many?
  • Where and how will you store your data? How will you provide back-ups?
  • How are you going to organise and describe your data?
  • Who gets access to your data? When? How are you going to manage access?
  • What data will be archived when the project is finished? Where and for how long?
  • Will the archived data be made available to others? When? Under what licence?
  • Who owns the data? Who is responsible for the management of your data?
  • Is there any funding to cover the costs of the implementation of the plan?

A DMP is a living document. It may well be that you are not able to answer some of these questions at first, or only roughly, for example because you wish to obtain someone's advice. Or it may turn out that it is better to handle things differently than originally planned. You can always adapt or add to your DMP.

How?

There are various templates and checklists available for drawing up a data management plan. The filled-in template is then your data management plan. Your research funder or research institute may have its own DMP template. If your funder or institute does not provide a template, you can use the general UvA or AUAS template. This template comes with a guidance document in which every question is explained.

Data archives such as DANS and 4TU.ResearchData provide checklists, with brief explanations of what is required.

If you apply for funding at one of the English Research Councils, you can use the DMPOnline to write a data management plan. Templates which satisfy the requirements of the most important American research funders are available via the DMPTool. 

The cost of data management

Good data management involves costs, both in hours and in money. The UK Data Service has developed a checklist which can help you work out these costs, for example for a grant request. 

Published by  RDM support

20 September 2017